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Growing up, Martyn Sibley was the only person with a disability at his primary school. Bullying was never really a problem because he made friends easily and some of them were big so no one messed with him. But there were times when the banter he enjoyed with his mates crossed the line.

It was raining and Martyn was waiting in a covered outdoor area with his classmates for his next lesson. There was a hole in the shelter above them where the water was pouring through like a torrent. A few of the guys were playing around, trying to push each other into the water. One of them turned to Martyn, turned off his wheelchair, lifted the back wheels off the ground and pushed him into the water.

I felt there was banter, but then to turn my wheelchair off, I was defenseless.

Martyn SibleyWorld Changing Blogger and Smiler

Even though the boys were his mates, he had no qualms taking the matter to the teachers. 

“I’m always happy to communicate, communication is so important.”

This philosophy has fed back into how Martyn lives his life – through incidents like that he learnt that you can’t just bottle things up inside – it doesn’t no good, only generating anger and frustration.

“It’s good to talk about something and share it, to point out injustice.”

While Martyn’s disability has shaped how he lives his life, he has never let it define him. Born with a rare neuromuscular condition, spinal muscular atrophy, he has needed a power wheelchair and a care support team ever since he can remember.

But at high school, he was able to interact with a wider range of people, including others with a disability.

“This was very important, because then there were others who understood what I was going through. But having friendships beyond disability gives a broader, more inclusive view.”

He excelled in school and dreamed of going to university. When the time came, he decided, like many other young people, to move away from home. Living a few hours away from his mother and father was a rather testing experience – for the first time, Martyn was in charge of his own care, his own funding and but most of all, his own life. 

I was going through the motions at university – I had a new lease of life after leaving home. I hit the partying hard, had wild nights with many beautiful women, my studies were almost a secondary thing.

Martyn SibleyWorld Changing Blogger and Smiler

It’s almost a miracle, he says, that he managed to make it out with not just a degree in economics but a masters in marketing as well. Once his studies were finished, he knew the logical thing was to try and find a job.

Eventually, after applying and being rejected for finance-type jobs in London (Martyn is still unsure whether his disability played a role in this), his dad found him a job for a disability charity. 

For the first year in his new role, Martyn moved back to live with his parents, which came with its own set of challenges. But it gave him time to settle into working life, the grind of Monday to Friday, 9 to 5. 

Eventually he was transferred from Cambridgeshire to London, and spent at least four years with the charity in a variety of roles from HR to fundraising.

The job with the charity was by no means his dream job, but it helped to set him up well for what was to come. It was here that he had something of an epiphany.

“I got the bug, realising so many people in the world have a disability, there’s so much education to do for society to help remove the barriers that are what disable us, attitude and policies, they are all societal constructs.”

Mind-set is an important thing for Martyn. A particularly long stint in hospital due to scoliosis saw him undergo a rather invasive surgical procedure. His lung was deflated, growth plates were removed and two titanium rods were screwed into his spine.

High as a kite on medications, Martyn lay in his hospital bed, knowing he had to be patient.

“Having the patience to know I would get better, and get back on with living life.”

But most of all he started to dream big – “to dream about adventures and careers, and love,” all the things he would do when he was better and got older.

MArtyn in a hot air balloon surrounded by reporters

The most important thing about these dreams were that they were genuinely his, not his parents, or those of the media.

It was this mind-set that saw him leave his job, now over 10 years ago, and start blogging. This would take him on a journey through social media, to speaking on global stages and cofounding charities.

Together with Srin Madipalli, Martyn created and developed Disability Horizons, an online digital magazine.

“It has lots of positive lifestyle content by disable people, for disabled people.”

Along this journey, Accomables was born, a version of Air BnB for disabled people, which was acquired by Air Bnb itself. Different filters mean those renting their homes have to specify whether it is accessible.

“They have to share a photo now too to prove accessibility, vendors need to understand what an accessible property means, and its not necessarily just for wheelchairs but for people who are blind, deaf, etc.”

In the UK alone, there are about 13 million people living with a variety of disabilities and its proposed that this section of the population has 250 billion pounds of spending power. 

“We are consumers, and we are votes, it’s quite empowering to realise as a big group, these businesses should be starting to think about what we need and want… it’s shifting the conversation and creating a marketing agency for businesses to spread accessible and inclusive products. Mainstream businesses are turning people away by not being inclusive now and making changes.”

Most of all, Martyn has realised many businesses have a fear of doing things wrong and angering people with a disability.

While heavy activism has its place, we’ve got to allow businesses to learn by doing says Martyn. Ultimately, businesses need the confidence to work with disabled people to design buildings and services.

As he said before the barriers facing disabled people originate from the environment and society itself.

I might have this disability, but its not me, it’s society, the problem is out there and it’s fixable. No one has gone out to create barriers and consciously discriminate

Martyn SibleyWorld Changing Blogger and Smiler

When the London Underground was built for example, there were barely any wheelchairs around, so there was no need to think about lifts and ramps.

“No one was wanting to be an asshole, we just need to wake them up and educate with love to what we need, so we can be included as citizens, employees, people of the world.”

This is probably the biggest piece of advice Martyn has for others in similar situations, especially those searching for work – dream big, and dream for yourself.

“Get down into yourself and say what kind of industry, what kind of job, what does the perfect role look like?”

A lot of people with disabilities go into self-employment to balance their health issues, and avoid the discrimination present in mainstream businesses, but Martyn says you just need to be open-minded.

“There are job boards looking for diverse talent, you just need to get on the ladder, to have the right experiences to work towards your dream job. I’m now in my dream job, but I still want to change the world and I’m still aiming for bigger and better things, you have to stay hungry and have an insatiable appetite to do more.”

An “abundance” mind-set is another way to refer to it. There’s always a job, a company, an employer out there looking for what you can give them.

“When we look at it as being finite, there’s only so many jobs up in the economy, all of this competition, can I get it? That mind-set takes away the confidence needed.”

Ever since that incident back in the school yard, Martyn has been passionate about speaking out.

“It’s cathartic, blogging is a good way to open up and let your feelings out. The less people really understand your situation and how you’re feeling, you tend to bottle it up. Writing helps you work out your own feeling and perceptions of the world.”

Especially being from the UK, Martyn says the stiff upper lip stereotype is very true. People tend to smile through their problems and refuse to talk about them, but it’s good to be in touch with your emotions.

So what else is in the pipeline for Adaptdefier Martyn Sibley?

Well he still does a lot of talking and blogging, and will soon be off overseas to create some Instagram content on accessible tourism. He has his very own podcast, the Martyn Sibley Show and he continues to work as a coach for an online course for social change professionals.

Oh and he’s getting married next year.

You can keep up to date with Martyn’s antics on all of the social media accounts from Facebook, to Instagram, Twitter and Linkedin. There’s also his website which gives information on his charity as well as his book.

Martyn’s parting words are of the importance of co-production and design.

“We need a lot more listening to needs of disabled people, what does the end user experience?”

His last piece of advice?

Go out and create your own solution - find a problem and solve it yourself with like minded people.

Martyn SibleyWorld Changing Blogger and Smiler

If you’d rather listen than read…

Listen to the Podcast with Martyn Sibley now.

Never Drop Anything Again

The LapStacker®

Carry items on your lap with confidence using the world’s first retractable strap system for wheelchairs.

Terms & Conditions

By entering the New Zealand Spinal Trust LapStacker Giveaway you agree to the following Terms & Conditions:

  1. Available for New Zealand residents only. 
  2. Only available for those covered by Ministry of Health (MOH)
  3. Entries may be submitted between 8.00am 16th November to 1159pm 13th December (NZDT)
  4. Winners will be chosen at random, except for the best video which will be selected by a panel. 
  5. Winners will be drawn on the following schedule (all PST):
    1. 10am Monday Nov. 23
    2. 10am Monday Nov. 30
    3. 10am Monday Dec. 7
    4. 10am Monday Dec. 14
    5. Video winner – 10am Monday Dec. 14
  6. Winners will be notified by email and given 7 days to accept their prize and select their LapStacker. (Further instructions will be provided.) 
  7. We reserve the right to select an alternate winner if the above condition is not met or the LapStacker is not suitable for the winner’s wheelchair.  
  8. Winners agree to provide an image or video of their LapStacker in use within 20 days of receiving it.
  9. You give Adaptdefy and NZ Spinal Trust permission to use all submitted photos and videos for promotional purposes.
  10. You agree to receive communications via email from NZ Spinal Trust and Adaptdefy. You can of course unsubscribe. if 

Terms & Conditions

By entering the High Fives LapStacker Giveaway you agree to the following Terms & Conditions:

  1. Available for North American residents only. 
  2. Entries may be submitted between 8.00am 1st November to 10.00pm 28 November (PST)
  3. Winners will be chosen at random, except for the best video which will be selected by a panel. 
  4. Winners will be drawn on the following schedule (all PST):
    1. 5pm Sunday Nov. 08
    2. 5pm Sunday Nov. 15
    3. 5pm Sunday Nov. 22
    4. 5pm Sunday Nov. 29
    5. Video winner – 5pm Monday Nov. 30th
  5. Winners will be notified by email and given 7 days to accept their prize and select their LapStacker. (Further instructions will be provided.) 
  6. We reserve the right to select an alternate winner if the above condition is not met or the LapStacker is not suitable for the winner’s wheelchair.  
  7. Winners agree to provide an image or video of their LapStacker in use within 20 days of receiving it.
  8. You give Adaptdefy and High Fives Foundation permission to use all submitted photos and videos for promotional purposes.
  9. You agree to receive communications via email from High Fives and Adaptdefy. 
  10. Canadian residents will be required to pay import taxes (typically CAD$20-30) before local delivery of their LapStacker. Sorry, but we can’t do anything about that. I hope you’ll agree this is a small price to pay for some LapStacking freedom!

Retractor Location Guide - Lower Horizontal Frame Tube

Watch the video or read on below
Play Video
Brackets Used

If you choose to mount the Retractors from the lower horizontal frame tube you’ll receive two 90 Brackets (as seen below) – one for the left and one for the right side of your chair.

The Retractors slot onto these Brackets, which are then attached vertically to the Lower Horizontal Frame Tube using Clamps.

Bracket Orientation

The Brackets have a tilt feature which allows you to adjust the angle of the Retractor so that it is parallel to the Keeper, for the smoothest operation.

Key Dimensions

The clamps are 16mm or ⅝” wide

The maximum distance from the centre of the Clamp to the centre of the Retractor webbing when mounted on the 90 Bracket is 70mm (3″).

Retractor Dimensions
The Retractors themselves are 75mm wide by 50mm high or 3×2″
Moving Other Attachments

Finally, it is worth noting that other attachments, such as brakes and side guard clamps can often be moved to accommodate the LapStacker® without compromising their function.

Need Help?

If this is the only option you’ve been given, it doesn’t look like it will work, or you’ve still got questions, then please contact us or your preferred reseller, and we’ll do our best to help.

Retractor Location Guide - Front Vertical Frame Tube

Play Video
Brackets Used

If you choose to mount the Retractors from the front vertical frame tube you’ll receive two Flat Brackets (as seen below) – one for the left and one for the right side of your chair.

The Retractors slot onto these Brackets, which are then attached to the front vertical frame tube using clamps.
Bracket Orientation

The Brackets have a single long slot and rotate feature, which provides plenty of adjustability so that you can align the Retractor webbing with the centre of the Keeper. 

Key Dimensions

The clamps are 16mm or ⅝” wide.

The maximum distance from the centre of the Clamp to the centre of the Retractor webbing when mounted on the Flat Bracket is 105mm (4 1/8″).

If the front vertical frame tube is too far forward to allow the Retractor webbing to align with your optimal Keeper position, or you don’t think you’ll have clearance from your legs, you may need to consider other Retractor locations available for your make and model.

The Retractors themselves are 75mm wide by 50mm high or 3×2″

Moving Other Attachments

Finally, it is worth noting that other attachments, such as brakes and side guard clamps can often be moved to accommodate the LapStacker® without compromising their function.

Need Help?

If this is the only option you’ve been given and it doesn’t look like it will work, or you’ve still got questions, then please contact us, or your preferred reseller, and we’ll do our best to help.

Retractor Location Guide - Cross Frame Rigidizer Bar

Play Video
Brackets Used

If you choose to mount the Retractors from the cross frame rigidizer bar, you’ll receive two Cross Tube Brackets (as seen below) – one for the left and one for the right side of your chair. These are automatically selected with the Retractor location chosen.

The Retractors slot onto these Brackets, which are then attached to the cross frame rigidizer bar using clamps. The Retractors can be mounted above or below the Brackets depending on clearance.

Batec Style Docking Bar

In most cases the Retractor can attach to a Batec-style docking bar in the same way it mounts to the cross frame rigidizer bar. 

In any case it is best you contact us, or your reseller, so we can help you determine if this is suitable and to confirm the correct clamp is ordered.


Bracket Orientation

The Brackets have slots in them to allow plenty of adjustability so that you can align the Retractor webbing with the centre of the Keeper.

The maximum distance from the centre of the Clamp to the centre of the Retractor webbing when mounted on the Cross Tube Bracket is 90mm ( 3.5″).

Clamp Dimensions
Retractor Dimensions & Weight
Leg Clearance

Please note, there must be clearance from the back of your legs, so we suggest mounting the Bracket and Retractor back a little bit from the edge of your cushion.

Seat Clearance

The Brackets are best tilted slightly downward, so the Retractors don’t touch the seat when the chair is in use.

Moving Other Attachments

Finally, it is worth noting that other attachments, such as brakes and side guard clamps can often be moved to accommodate the LapStacker® without compromising their function.

Need Help?

If this is the only option you’ve been given, it doesn’t look like it will work, or you’ve still got questions, then please contact us, or your preferred reseller, and we’ll do our best to help.

Retractor Guide – Frame Top Tube

Play Video
Brackets Used

If you choose to mount the Retractors from the frame top tube, you’ll receive two 90 Brackets (as seen below). One for the left and one for the right side of your chair.

The Retractors slot onto these Brackets, which are then attached to the top tube using clamps.

Bracket Orientation

Depending on what clearance you have available, the Brackets can be mounted forward of the clamp (above) or behind the clamp (below) to ensure that the Retractor webbing can align with the optimal keeper position.

The Brackets have a tilt feature which allows you to adjust the angle of the Retractor so that it is parallel to the Keeper, for the smoothest operation.

Key Dimensions

The clamps are 16mm or ⅝” wide.

The maximum distance from the centre of the clamp to the centre of the Retractor webbing when mounted on the 90 Bracket is 70mm or 3″.

The Retractors themselves are 75mm wide by 50mm high or 3×2″

Recommended Configuration

The Brackets are best mounted horizontally and tilted slightly downward, so the Retractors are tucked away and don’t touch the seat when the chair is in use.

 

It is very important to note that there must be clearance from the back of your legs, so we suggest mounting the Bracket and Retractor back a little bit from the edge of your cushion.

Moving Other Attachments
Finally, it is worth noting that other attachments, such as brakes and side guard clamps can often be moved to accommodate the LapStacker® clamp without compromising their function.
Need Help?

If this is the only option you’ve been given and it doesn’t look like it will work, or you’ve still got questions, then please contact us and we’ll do our best to assist.

Side Guard Keeper Guide

Play Video
Introduction

The Side Guard Keeper is only recommended after the Long and Short Keepers have been exhausted as options.

The Side Guard Keeper is often used for wheelchairs with short frames or where the side guards are oversized or extend forward beyond the wheels. 

How is the Side Guard Keeper Mounted?

The Side Guard Keeper mounts inside, or cushion side, of your side guards (otherwise known as the wheel guards or clothing guards). It is fixed in place using an adhesive patch. 

It is not recommended for fabric side guards, although it can work there with some custom modification.

You MUST have a gap between the side guard and Frame Top Tube so that
the webbing from the Retractor can pass through to the Keeper.

When is the Side Guard Keeper an Option?

The Side Guard Keeper could be an option when there is not enough space for a Long or Short Keeper and the side guard extends sufficiently forward of your body so that it comes close to the optimal Keeper position.

Some wheelchair makes such as the Hands on Concept range of chairs have oversized side guards and these are good examples of where a side guard can work.

Requirements

You must have:

  • 50mm (W) x 35mm (H) of clear space on your side guards, close to the mid-point where you will carry objects.
  • A rigid side guard suitable for adhering foam tape to.
  • A gap between the side guard and Frame Top Tube so that the webbing from the Retractor can pass through to the Keeper.
Dimensions and Weight
Pros
  • Robust, and simple to install
  • An option if the short or long Keepers are not viable
  • Cons
  • Not suitable for fabric side guards
  • Less adjustment available
  • More difficult to access the Buckles
  • Recommended Configuration

    We recommend the Side Guard Keeper is located so it doesn’t sit higher than your cushion. 

     

    From the testing we have done in that location, it should not interfere with the body or be a problem for skin pressure. We do recommend CAUTION and suggest that this is assessed carefully.
    Retractor Alignment

    Remember, the Keeper must align with the Retractor webbing so please keep this in mind as you review the Retractor Location Guides.

    Need Help?

    If this is the only option you’ve been given and it doesn’t look like it will work, or you’ve still got questions, then please contact us, or your preferred reseller, and we’ll do our best to assist.

    Short Keeper Guide

    Play Video
    Introduction

    The Short Keeper attaches directly to the Frame Top Tube and is most commonly used for folding wheelchairs.

    It may also be suitable for rigid wheelchairs that don’t have adequate space to Velcro a Long Keeper onto the seat base or webbing.

    If you have a rigid chair, a Short Keeper can usually only be placed forward of the seat base which generally places the LapStacker® forward of the ideal position. Please bear this in mind.

    Pros
    • Does not require a seat base to attach to the chair
    • Can be mounted forward of the seat base if required
    • Provides an option if the Long Keeper will not suit
    • Can be mounted in a variety of ways
    Cons
    • More parts
    • More complex to install
    • Less adjustment available
    Mounting Options

    The Short Keeper can be mounted to your wheelchair frame’s top tube in three ways.

    1. Snap-Fit Mount

    If your wheelchair has a 1” or 25mm frame top tube, the Short Keeper will be supplied with a snap fitting that is simply pressed in place onto the tubing. 

    The Short Keeper is then fastened to the snap fitting and can be fine-tuned by sliding it forward and back, before tightening the bolt with the supplied allen key.

     

    You’ll require 1” or 25mm of relatively flat clear space on the tubing for the snap fit mount and 55mm or 2 3/16” for the Short Keeper itself.

    2. Universal Mount

    If your wheelchair has a frame top tube diameter that is any size other than 1” or 25mm then a universal mount will be supplied.

    The universal mount attaches via two supplied cable ties and requires 1 ⅜” or 35mm of relatively flat space on the frame top tubing to be mounted effectively.

     

    Again, the position of the Short Keeper can then be fine tuned by sliding it forward and back on the universal mount.

    3. Direct Mount

    The Short Keeper can also be mounted directly to the tubing without the snap fit or universal mount using the supplied cable ties and rubber pad. 

    Common Scenarios

    There are three common scenarios where the Short Keeper is used.

    Scenario 1 - Folding Wheelchairs

    The first scenario is for folding wheelchairs (as below) that have a separate seat frame that moves up and down as it folds.

    In this scenario the Short Keeper fixes to the frame top tube, not the seat frame, so that when the seat frame moves up and down the Short Keeper does not move.

     

    If you have a folding wheelchair that doesn’t have a separate seat frame that moves up and down independently of the main frame, then the Long Keeper may be the better option for you.

    Scenario 2 - Forward of the Seat Base

    When there is not enough space to Velcro a Long Keeper to the solid or upholstery seat base, a Short Keeper can be mounted forward of your seat base provided there is enough flat area of tubing to mount it. 

     

    Please refer to the three mounting options above to determine if you have enough space to mount the Short Keeper in this position.

    Important Note - Leg Clearance

    It is important to note, that in all cases where the Short Keeper is mounted forward of the seat base, the Retractors should NOT be located horizontally off the frame top tube or cross frame rigidizer bar as they will be in the way of your legs.

     

    In this case, the Retractors will need to be mounted from the lower horizontal frame tube or the front vertical frame tube if these options are available for your chair. 

    More about these locations is provided in the Retractor Location Guides.

    Space for Hands

    If you use your frame top tube as a hand hold for transfers then you may want to consider how much space you will have available after mounting the Short Keeper, remembering that it is 55mm (2 3/16”) wide. 

     

    If there is insufficient space on top, you may consider mounting the Short Keeper directly under the top tube (as shown above) to give you more clearance.

    Scenario 3 - With Strap/Belt Seat Upholstery

    The Short Keeper may be suitable for rigid wheelchairs that use a strap/belt system for their seat base, particularly when there are doubts about aligning the Long Keeper up with these straps, or the surface area available to fix the adhesive velcro. 

    Short Keeper mounted directly to Top Frame Tube
    Short Keeper mounted with a snap fit to Top Frame Tube
    Retractor Alignment

    Remember, the Keeper must align with the Retractor webbing so you may have to come back to the Keeper guides to double check your choice after you’ve reviewed the Retractor Location Guides.

    Please Note

    Unless asked, you do not have to know the frame top tube diameter of your wheelchair as this is automatically selected for you based on your make and model. 

    Need Help?

    If this is the only option you’ve been given, it doesn’t look like it will work, or you’ve still got questions, then please contact us or your preferred reseller, and we’ll do our best to help.

    Long Keeper Guide

    Play Video
    Introduction

    The Long Keeper is almost exclusively used for rigid wheelchairs and gives the greatest amount of adjustment. It is robust, and simple to install

    Requirements
    • Requires 55mm (2 3/16”) of space on a solid or upholstery seat base forward of any side guards.
    • Can only be used with a rigid or fabric seat base, or a webbing base with straps that are 50mm or wider.
    • Not suitable for folding wheelchairs (with a few exceptions)
    Is There Enough Room?

    Do you have this room available? Will the location of the Keeper be close to your optimal position? If so, then the Long Keeper could work for you.

    How is it Attached?

    The Long Keeper attaches to the rigid or upholstery seat base, using adhesive Velcro which is provided. 

    It is worth noting that an upholstery seat base or strap system often has velcro sewn into it already and this can be used in addition to the Velcro provided.

    What About Strap/Belt Style Seat Upholstery?

    If you have a strap system for your seat base, then you will need to determine if there is a strap close enough to your optimal Keeper position to velcro or tape the Long Keeper to.

    You may be able to move the straps so that they are inline with your preferred Keeper position and if a strap already has Velcro on it, you may be able to use this in addition to the velcro supplied.

    If the strap can’t be moved or you’re not sure you can stick the Long Keeper to it, then selecting the Short Keeper (shown below), which attaches directly to the top frame tube of your wheelchair, may be a better option. You can learn more in the Short Keeper Guide.

    What About Folding Wheelchairs?

    If you have a folding wheelchair with a rising seat frame the Long Keeper won’t be suitable and a Short Keeper will be a better option.

    Retractor alignment

    The other factor that is important is making sure the webbing from the Retractor lines up with the optimal Keeper position.

    Need help?

    If this is the only option you’ve been given, it doesn’t look like it will work, or you’ve still got questions, then please contact us or your preferred reseller, and we’ll do our best to help.

    Keeper Location Overview

    Play Video
    Choosing the Best Keeper Location

    While in your wheelchair look down at your side and imagine using the LapStacker® to secure an item. Find the midpoint for this object and take a note of where this position is on your wheelchair frame’s top tube.

    Ideally, the Keepers are positioned central to where you will carry items, but the LapStacker® will still work if forward or back of this point. 

    Keeper and Retractor Alignment

    It is important to note that the Keeper needs to be in a position where the webbing from the Retractor can pass freely up into the Keeper and they also need to be aligned. 

    Keeper Guides

    Each Keeper style has its own Guide which will help you determine its suitability. Please review these guides in the next step of the selection process. 

    Need help?

    If, for some reason, none of the Keeper options look like they will work for you, or you’re unsure of something, then please feel free to contact us, or your preferred reseller, and we’ll do our best to help.

    Key Component Overview

    Play Video
    Retractors

    Every LapStacker® Set has two Retractors (seen below) – one for each side of your wheelchair. These contain the tensioned strap and locking mechanism.

    Retractor Locations

    Depending on your wheelchair make and model, you’ll be given a number of options for where the Retractors can be mounted. 

    These locations include the frame top tube, the cross frame rigidizer bar, the front vertical frame tube, and lastly, the lower horizontal frame tube which is common on folding chairs and dual tube rigid wheelchairs.

    Clamps and Brackets

    The Retractors mount to the wheelchair frame using a specific Clamp and Bracket (there are many types, including the 90 Bracket and  1″ Clamp seen below). 

    These are both automatically selected once your preferred Retractor mounting location is chosen.

    They are made from high quality and lightweight aluminium, with a stylish anodized finish.

    Buckles

    The Buckles attach to the Retractor straps. They use high strength magnets to guide the two sides together, then lock mechanically as the straps tighten.

    They are precision machined from aircraft grade aluminium for strength and anodized for a stylish finish.

     

    The Buckles are held in place by your side using Keepers. 

    Keepers

    We’ve designed three styles of Keeper and you’ll be asked to choose one from the available options for your chair. 

    Long Keeper

    The Long Keeper velcros to the wheelchair seat upholstery, or rigid seat base.

    Short Keeper

    The Short Keeper connects directly to the frame top tube.

    Side Guard Keeper

    The Side Guard Keeper mounts on the cushion side of a wheelchair’s side guards

    Are you eligible?

    Adaptdefy Ltd. is a VAT registered company; therefore purchases from customers within the EU are subject to UK Value Added Tax (VAT) at 20%.

    You will be eligible for exemption from VAT, however, if you meet one of the following criteria:

    • You have a physical or mental impairment which has a long-term and substantial adverse effect upon your ability to carry out everyday activities
    • You have a condition that the medical profession treats as a chronic sickness
    • You are terminally ill
    • You are making the purchase on behalf of your spouse or child, who meets one of the above criteria
    • You are purchasing from outside the European Union (EU)

    You will not normally be eligible for exemption from VAT if:

    • You, or the person you are buying for, intends to use the products for business purposes (personal and domestic use is okay)
    • The products will not be used by a particular individual or individuals but chronically sick or disabled people in general

    By entering your name and/or disability in the checkout you are making a written declaration that you are eligible for VAT exemption. Adaptdefy Ltd. will hold your details alongside your declaration in case of a query by the UK Tax Office (HMRC). You do not need to prove your eligibility at point of purchase, but may be required to do so by HMRC at a future date.

    If you are not eligible for VAT exemption please leave the VAT exemption fields blank. VAT at 20% will automatically be added to orders within the UK or European Union.